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Great Smoky Mt. National Park #EP113

$9.95

Great Smoky Mt. National Park #EP113

$9.95

Great Smoky Mt. National Park  27″x39″
Two-sided
Features: Topographic Map (1:62,500) of Great Smoky Mountains Naitonal Park, Backcountry Regulations, Safety Considerations, Trail Mileages and Descriptions.

SKU: EP113 Categories: ,

Great Smoky Mt. National Park 27″x39″ Two-sided. Features: Topographic Map (1:62,500) of Great Smoky Mountains Naitonal Park, Backcountry Regulations, Safety Considerations, Trail Mileages and Descriptions. Great Smoky Mountain National Park has over 4,000 species of plants that grow there. A walk from mountain base to peak compares with traveling 1,250 miles north. Several resident plants and animals live only in the Smokies. It also has a rich cultural history. From the Cherokee Indians, to the Scotch-Irish settlers, this land was home to a variety of cultures and people. Many historic structures remain standing. Subsistence turned to exploitation as logging concerns stripped the region of timber. Recovery is now the dominant theme.

There are 9,000,000 visits per year. The National Park Service must balance the needs of the land with the desires of the people both today and for the future.

The Park is an International Biosphere Reserve and a World Heritage Site. These international recognitions represent the Smokies importance to the planet. Neither designation results in a loss of national sovereignty or infringement on private land use, including development. The purpose of this United Nations program is to recognize and encourage preservation of the world’s great cultural and biological areas. The United States’ National Park Service is proud to steward this world renowned site.

The International Biosphere Reserve Program is a voluntary approach to help preserve and protect the world’s biological resources. Each reserve has a core and buffer areas. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, shielded from development, provides a core area. Other public lands serve as the buffer. Education is the only tool used to promote stewardship among private land owners. Other International Biosphere Reserves include Yellowstone, Yosemite, and Grand Canyon National Parks.

The World Heritage Site designation denotes the Park’s inventory of Appalachian cultural items from the 19th and early 20th century. Combined with the Park’s management to maintain cultural landscapes, such as in Cades Cove and Cataloochee, the Park stewards a unique cultural resource. Like biosphere reserves, it is a voluntary program working to preserve Earth’s resources and history. Other World Heritage Sites include Yellowstone and Mammoth Cave National Parks.